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Aaron H. Payne papers

Aaron H. Payne (1901 to 1994) was a Chicago-area attorney and civic activist. In 1926, after studying law at the University of Chicago Law School, he was admitted to the Bar of the State of Illinois. Three years later Payne served as Assistant City Prosecutor, Assistant Corporate Counsel, and Arbitrator for the Illinois Industrial Commission. In addition, he served for

Abbott-Sengstacke Family Papers

The Abbott-Sengstacke Family papers include materials from Robert Sengstacke Abbott (1868-1940) and John Herman Henry Sengstacke (1912-1997), as well as John’s wife Myrtle Elizabeth Picou Sengstacke (1914-1990). The papers trace the Abbott-Sengstacke family history from the mid-19th century in Georgia through Abbott's move to Chicago and creation of a journalistic empire, to the death of Sengstacke in 1997. Robert S.

Abraham Feinglass collection of visual materials

Primarily depicts union meetings, conferences, conventions, in Chicago and other cities; and leaders of the International Fur and Leather Workers Union (I.F.L.W.U.) and the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America while Feinglass served as I.F.L.W.U. president (1954-1955) and international vice-president of Fur & Leather Dept. of Amalgamated Meat Cutters (1956-1980). Includes a few photographs of demonstrations by

Abraham Feinglass papers

Correspondence, speeches, articles, memoranda, reports, reference materials, U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation file spanning four decades on Feinglass's alleged left-wing activities, and bound vols. of periodicals Fur Worker and Fur and Leather Worker, issued by International Fur Workers Union of the United States and Canada and its successor International Fur and Leather Workers Union of the United States and Canada.

Abraham, Alton. Collection of Sun Ra

Alton Abraham (1927-1999), entrepreneur and hospital technician, was a longtime friend and business associate of Sun Ra (1914-1993), the influential jazz composer and musician. Alton Abraham collected manuscripts, business records, printed ephemera, artifacts, photographs, audio and video recordings, and other documents of his work with Sun Ra. The collection contains textual, graphic, and audio-visual records of the work of Sun

Adlean Harris papers

This collection documents Adlean Harris’ work as a librarian, genealogist, researcher, and astrologer. The Adlean Harris Papers span the years 1876 to 2007 with the bulk of the material ranging from 1970 to 1995.

Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago records

The Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago was established in 1924 and incorporated in 1925 as the Chicago Forum Council. The purpose was "to promote understanding and good will by bringing people of different groups into friendly association with each other for discussion of problems related to the public welfare." The collection contains annual reports, brochures, constitution and by-laws, correspondence,

African-American Studies Program records

The Afro-American Studies program (AASP) was formally started in March 1971 through the work of the AASP Committee and Dr. Milton A. Gordon, who was named the first director. The Afro-American Studies program was introduced to add the possibility of studying Black history and culture into the Loyola curriculum. In 1990 the name of the Afro-American Studies Program was changed

Afro-American Genealogical and Historical Society of Chicago records

The Afro-American Genealogical and Historical Society of Chicago (AAGHSC) was created to preserve and perpetuate the records of African American history and to encourage the study of African American genealogy. AAGHSC is a volunteer organization whose society members are experts in the field of African American genealogical research. AAGHSC helped family historians overcome challenges in African American ancestry research resulting

Aldridge Collection

The Aldridge Collection consists of materials relating to 19th century African-American tragedian Ira Frederick Aldridge (1807-1867) and his children, mainly his daughter Amanda Christina Elizabeth Aldridge (known as Amanda Ira Aldridge, who composed under the pseudonym Montague Ring; 1866-1956). Included in the collection are correspondence, photographs and engravings, newspaper clippings, musical manuscripts and scores, personal and legal documents, articles, memorabilia,

Alice Browning Papers

Alice Browning (née Crolley) was born in 1907 at Provident Hospital in Chicago, the oldest of three siblings. She was an educator and writer, eventually publishing her short stories in newspapers and magazines and founding or co-founding several publications related to African American authors and writing. Browning's papers include correspondence, manuscripts, serials, newsletters, photographs, newspaper clippings, pamphlets and memorabilia.

Alice Tregay Papers

Alice Lucille Tregay (Hicks) was born November 14, 1929 in Evanston, Illinois. She is one of three siblings; she has three children with her husband James Tregay, and has six grandchildren. She attending Evanston Township High School and later graduated from Roosevelt University. Throughout her life, Tregay was known as a political activist, advocating for civil rights issues. She worked

Alva Beatrice Maxey-Boyd papers

Alva Beatrice Maxey (1913-2009) was a social worker and educator. This collection is largely representative of Maxey’s educational and work history, especially her time as a Professor of Sociology at Northeastern Illinois University and her work as the Community Organization Director for the Chicago Urban League in the 1950s. Also well represented is Maxey and Charles Boyd’s battle to preserve

Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union Midwest records

Correspondence, legal files, topical files (especially 1968-1974 from Tom Herriman's office), pamphlets, and four scrapbooks of the Chicago and Central States Joint Board, as well as correspondence and minutes from various locals of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union, AFL-CIO, including: Local 6 minute and cash books (in Czech), 1919-1940; Local 39 minute books, 1922-1927 and 1939-1949; Local 61

Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union Midwest visual materials

Black-and-white photographic prints, contact sheets (one color), and negatives depicting the activities of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union, including union actions, meetings, and union members. Also includes several views of union members at demonstrations and political rallies. There is also an album of group portraits taken at annual conventions held in Chicago and New York between 1920 and

American Association of University Women, Chicago Area Council and Chicago Branch records

The American Association of University Women (AAUW), Chicago Branch was formed in 1889. Prior to 1921, the AAUW was known as the Association of Collegiate Alumnae. The Chicago Area Council was created in June 1969 by the Illinois State Division of the AAUW. The relationship between the Chicago Branch and the Chicago Area Council is not known.

American Civil Liberties Union. Illinois Division. Records

Documents the activities of the Illinois Division of the American Civil Liberties Union from its founding through the early 1980s. Includes case files, finances and fundraising information, individual and institutional correspondence, minutes, newsletters and publications, film, audio cassettes, and photographs.

American Colonization Society records

Correspondence, account sheets, constitution, instructions to agents, letters of introduction from the Board of Managers, and other materials of the American Colonization Society. Topics include the formation of auxiliary societies, importance of suppressing the slave trade, African settlements, fund-raising, and captured Africans recommended to the attention of the society after they have been discharged from the U.S. Correspondents include Dr.

American Friends Service Committee records

The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) is a Religious Society of Friends (Quaker) founded in 1917 to work for peace and social justice in the United States and around the world. It was created in order to provide conscientious objectors ways to serve without joining the military or taking lives. Through the years, the Committee became known for its work

American Jewish Congress, Chicago Division records

The national AJC was founded in 1918 in Philadelphia, a response to the worsening conditions of European Jews in the years before World War I. Its goals were to establish unity within the Jewish community and represent all groups of Jews in a democratic forum, and defend the rights of Jews abroad. The advent of World War II proved the

Andrew Paschal papers

Andrew Paschal (1907-1990) was a Chicago-based historian and educator who specialized in social history and the life and work of W.E.B. DuBois. A graduate of Northwestern University’s school of journalism, Paschal wrote for the WPA Illinois Writers’ Project and was published in several newspapers and journals, including the Chicago Defender, Pittsburgh Courier, Crisis, Journal of Negro History, and Chicago Bee.

Ann Barzel Dance Research Collection

Materials collected by dance critic Ann Barzel, documenting the history of dance in Chicago and worldwide. Research collection includes brochures and other publicity, newsclippings, programs, souvenir books, audiovisual material, posters and prints, photographs, scrapbooks, and artifacts.

Ann Brown papers

Ann Brown was a member of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs and longtime member of the Missionary Society of Arnett Chapel A.M.E. Church.

Anna Belle Frazier Papers

Anna Belle Frazier (1918-2005) was an African-American social and civic leader in Evanston, Illinois during the second half of the 20th Century. She was an active member of various organizations such as the Ladies Auxiliary of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Ebenezer A.M.E Church, Order of the Eastern Star, Norshore 12, and Suburbanites. The bulk of the material comprising the

Annetta Dieckmann papers

Annetta Dieckmann (1888-1974) was a pioneer in women’s rights and welfare work. She was appointed the first industrial secretary for the National Board of the Young Women’s Christian Association in 1918. In 1924, she moved to Chicago and served as the industrial secretary of the Chicago YWCA. Upon her retirement in 1956, Annetta Dieckmann became a full-time volunteer as secretary