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Community centers--Illinois--Chicago (5)     x 1960s (5)     x 1930s (5)     x 1950s (5)     x clear facets
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Juvenile Welfare Association Records

The collection includes the records of the Juvenile Welfare Association and materials on founder Bertha Lyons' Self-Development Course, including lessons, sheet music, recitations, or dramatic exercises. Documents also include scripts from the Adult Education Program created by Works Progress Administration (WPA) from 1938-1939.

Marcy-Newberry Association records

The Marcy-Newberry Association was formed from the Marcy Center and the Newberry Avenue Center. Marcy Center, founded in 1896, offered settlement house services to residents of the Maxwell Street neighborhood and later the Lawndale neighborhood in Chicago. By the 1950s, the Center was serving a primarily African American population. Newberry Avenue Center was founded in the 1930s in the original

Onward Neighborhood House records

Onward Neighborhood House was established in 1926 as a community center serving the near northwest neighborhoods of Chicago, by a group of volunteers from the Glencoe Union Church and the Winnetka Congregational Church. It was named after the Onward Presbyterian Church, which served as its first home. The programs offered by Onward House were modified as the needs of the

Rosenwald, Julius. Papers

Julius Rosenwald, businessman and philanthropist. The papers of Julius Rosenwald contain correspondence, reports, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, memorabilia, and a 1963 Rosenwald family tree. The collection documents Rosenwald's deep sense of social responsibility and commitment to philanthropic and civic endeavors, in particular his support of rural schools for African Americans, higher education, Jewish charities, and medical care. The collection also includes

Young Men's Christian Association - Duncan Maxwell records

The Young Men's Christian Association, Duncan Maxwell Branch, located at 1012 West Maxwell Street was formed in 1932 when the facility, a dispensary for the Michael Reese Hospital, was given to the Chicago YMCA. The Maxwell Street facility was noted for its open door policy, serving all members of the community regardless of age, religion, race or nationality. The Duncan