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Abbott-Sengstacke Family Papers

The Abbott-Sengstacke Family papers include materials from Robert Sengstacke Abbott (1868-1940) and John Herman Henry Sengstacke (1912-1997), as well as John’s wife Myrtle Elizabeth Picou Sengstacke (1914-1990). The papers trace the Abbott-Sengstacke family history from the mid-19th century in Georgia through Abbott's move to Chicago and creation of a journalistic empire, to the death of Sengstacke in 1997. Robert S.

Abraham, Alton. Collection of Sun Ra

Alton Abraham (1927-1999), entrepreneur and hospital technician, was a longtime friend and business associate of Sun Ra (1914-1993), the influential jazz composer and musician. Alton Abraham collected manuscripts, business records, printed ephemera, artifacts, photographs, audio and video recordings, and other documents of his work with Sun Ra. The collection contains textual, graphic, and audio-visual records of the work of Sun

Adlean Harris papers

This collection documents Adlean Harris’ work as a librarian, genealogist, researcher, and astrologer. The Adlean Harris Papers span the years 1876 to 2007 with the bulk of the material ranging from 1970 to 1995.

Afro-American Genealogical and Historical Society of Chicago records

The Afro-American Genealogical and Historical Society of Chicago (AAGHSC) was created to preserve and perpetuate the records of African American history and to encourage the study of African American genealogy. AAGHSC is a volunteer organization whose society members are experts in the field of African American genealogical research. AAGHSC helped family historians overcome challenges in African American ancestry research resulting

Aldridge Collection

The Aldridge Collection consists of materials relating to 19th century African-American tragedian Ira Frederick Aldridge (1807-1867) and his children, mainly his daughter Amanda Christina Elizabeth Aldridge (known as Amanda Ira Aldridge, who composed under the pseudonym Montague Ring; 1866-1956). Included in the collection are correspondence, photographs and engravings, newspaper clippings, musical manuscripts and scores, personal and legal documents, articles, memorabilia,

Alice Browning Papers

Alice Browning (née Crolley) was born in 1907 at Provident Hospital in Chicago, the oldest of three siblings. She was an educator and writer, eventually publishing her short stories in newspapers and magazines and founding or co-founding several publications related to African American authors and writing. Browning's papers include correspondence, manuscripts, serials, newsletters, photographs, newspaper clippings, pamphlets and memorabilia.

Alice Tregay Papers

Alice Lucille Tregay (Hicks) was born November 14, 1929 in Evanston, Illinois. She is one of three siblings; she has three children with her husband James Tregay, and has six grandchildren. She attending Evanston Township High School and later graduated from Roosevelt University. Throughout her life, Tregay was known as a political activist, advocating for civil rights issues. She worked

Alva Beatrice Maxey-Boyd papers

Alva Beatrice Maxey (1913-2009) was a social worker and educator. This collection is largely representative of Maxey’s educational and work history, especially her time as a Professor of Sociology at Northeastern Illinois University and her work as the Community Organization Director for the Chicago Urban League in the 1950s. Also well represented is Maxey and Charles Boyd’s battle to preserve

Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union Midwest records

Correspondence, legal files, topical files (especially 1968-1974 from Tom Herriman's office), pamphlets, and four scrapbooks of the Chicago and Central States Joint Board, as well as correspondence and minutes from various locals of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union, AFL-CIO, including: Local 6 minute and cash books (in Czech), 1919-1940; Local 39 minute books, 1922-1927 and 1939-1949; Local 61

American Association of University Women, Chicago Area Council and Chicago Branch records

The American Association of University Women (AAUW), Chicago Branch was formed in 1889. Prior to 1921, the AAUW was known as the Association of Collegiate Alumnae. The Chicago Area Council was created in June 1969 by the Illinois State Division of the AAUW. The relationship between the Chicago Branch and the Chicago Area Council is not known.

Ann Barzel Dance Research Collection

Materials collected by dance critic Ann Barzel, documenting the history of dance in Chicago and worldwide. Research collection includes brochures and other publicity, newsclippings, programs, souvenir books, audiovisual material, posters and prints, photographs, scrapbooks, and artifacts.

Ann Brown papers

Ann Brown was a member of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs and longtime member of the Missionary Society of Arnett Chapel A.M.E. Church.

Anna Belle Frazier Papers

Anna Belle Frazier (1918-2005) was an African-American social and civic leader in Evanston, Illinois during the second half of the 20th Century. She was an active member of various organizations such as the Ladies Auxiliary of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Ebenezer A.M.E Church, Order of the Eastern Star, Norshore 12, and Suburbanites. The bulk of the material comprising the

Archibald J. Motley, Jr. papers and photographs

Correspondence, publications, manuscripts, photocopies of sketches and sketchbooks, photographs, sound recordings, and a videocassette related to the life and work of Archibald J. Motley, Jr., a painter known for his portraiture and scenes of urban life. Included are his handwritten manuscript "The Negro in Art," documentation of his numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Foundation grant, items related to exhibitions in

Archives of the South Side Community Art Center

The South Side Community Art Center opened in 1940 and is one of the only surviving community art centers founded through New Deal’s Federal Art Project between 1937 and 1942. In its early years the Center was a hive of activity, as well as a who’s who of the Chicago Renaissance. Federal spending on WPA projects was cut dramatically upon

Art & Soul Records

Art & Soul (1968-1969) was a nonprofit workshop and gallery project designed and organized by the Conservative Vice Lords, Inc. in partnership with the Museum of Contemporary Art. It provided a platform for the West Side community to pursue creative collaboration and arts education. These records include organizational and funding proposals, course materials, photographic copies, slides and DVDs, interview transcripts,

Art Resources in Teaching Records

Art Resources in Teaching was founded as the Chicago Public School Art Society in 1894 at Hull-House. It was led by Ellen Gates Starr and included a group of women from the Chicago Woman’s Club. Its goal was to serve young people in the inner city. It did this initially by refurbishing classrooms and by providing art appreciation lectures and

Arthur Logan papers

Arthur Logan, a graphic artist, singer and choirmaster, was graphic designer for the 1927-1929 “Wonder Books,” edited by Frederic H. Robb. Logan was later active in Chicago churches as a choirmaster through the 1980s.

Austin Newspapers Collection

The collection contains community newspapers includes The Austin Herald, The Austin News, The Austinite, The Austin Voice, The Austin Weekly News, and The Windy City Word. The issues primarily span 1970-1997.

B.G. Gross, Ph.D., papers

Bethuel “B.G.” Gross’s extensive career spanned both music and psychology. He served as the organist and music director at numerous churches, including the St. James Methodist Church in Chicago and the Baker Memorial United Methodist Church in St. Charles, Illinois. Gross also held positions within university music departments, including the University of Akron, Shurtleff College (Alton, IL), and Loyola University

Barbara E. Allen Papers

Barbara E. Allen directed, produced, edited, and wrote the 2005 Emmy-winning documentary, Paper Trail: 100 Years of the Chicago Defender. The film was hosted by Harry J. Lennix and featured such notables as Earl Calloway, Robert Sengstacke, and then Senator Barack Obama. It celebrates the centennial of the Chicago Defender and skillfully chronicles the pivotal role this groundbreaking newspaper played

Ben Burns papers, part I

Ben Burns had a long and distinguished career as "a white editor in black journalism." He helped found Ebony and a number of other black publications and he trained many black writers in all aspects of print journalism. After working for black publications for thirty-five years, Burns referred to himself as "a black newspaperman, black in my orientation and thinking,

Bernard Weisberg papers

Correspondence, research files, legal documents, meeting minutes, newsletters, press releases, newspaper clippings, booklets, and other personal papers of Bernard Weisberg, a Chicago human rights lawyer. Materials relate to Weisberg's involvement with the 1970 Illinois Constitutional Convention and to his legal work, especially as general counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Illinois. Topics include police activities, the 1968

Berniece Ball Perry Papers

Berniece Ball Perry (1915-1995) was an African-American women's labor leader who lived and worked in Evanston, Illinois. She was an active member of a number of social and civic clubs and organizations and worked to ensure fair treatment of African-Americans in the workplace. The Berniece Ball Perry papers span from 1922 to 1997 and cover Perry's personal and professional life's

Bessie Coleman collection

Bessie Coleman, the first African American female pilot to obtain a license. Coleman learned French at a Berlitz school in the Chicago loop, withdrew the savings she had accumulated from her work as a manicurist and the manager of a chili parlor, and with the additional financial support of Abbott and another African American entrepreneur, she set off for Paris