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Afro-American Genealogical and Historical Society of Chicago records

The Afro-American Genealogical and Historical Society of Chicago (AAGHSC) was created to preserve and perpetuate the records of African American history and to encourage the study of African American genealogy. AAGHSC is a volunteer organization whose society members are experts in the field of African American genealogical research. AAGHSC helped family historians overcome challenges in African American ancestry research resulting

Aldridge Collection

The Aldridge Collection consists of materials relating to 19th century African-American tragedian Ira Frederick Aldridge (1807-1867) and his children, mainly his daughter Amanda Christina Elizabeth Aldridge (known as Amanda Ira Aldridge, who composed under the pseudonym Montague Ring; 1866-1956). Included in the collection are correspondence, photographs and engravings, newspaper clippings, musical manuscripts and scores, personal and legal documents, articles, memorabilia,

Alfred Balk Papers

Papers of Iowa-born and Northwestern-educated journalist Alfred Balk, documenting his career, first as a Chicago newswriter for WBBM, reporter for the Chicago Sun-Times and freelance contributor to major national magazines, and later as an editor at the Columbia Journalism Review, World Press Review, Saturday Review, and IEEE Spectrum, and faculty member at Columbia and Syracuse. Includes correspondence, working files for

Alice Tregay Papers

Alice Lucille Tregay (Hicks) was born November 14, 1929 in Evanston, Illinois. She is one of three siblings; she has three children with her husband James Tregay, and has six grandchildren. She attending Evanston Township High School and later graduated from Roosevelt University. Throughout her life, Tregay was known as a political activist, advocating for civil rights issues. She worked

AMF Midway Postal Retirement Organization archives

The first African Americans allowed to work at Midway Airport’s AMF postal facility founded the AMF Midway Organization in 1991. They worked on trains, distributing mail throughout the Midwest. AMF Midway Postal Retirement Organization Archives include materials relating to the experience of AMF Midway (PTS)’s employees and the formation and history of AMF Midway Organization.

Angela Jackson (1951- ) Papers

Angela Jackson (1951- ), a member of Northwestern University's class of 1977, is a poet, novelist, playwright, and biographer. Her papers span the years 1966-2018; they contain biographical materials, correspondence, manuscripts, teaching material, and publications.

Ann Barzel Dance Research Collection

Materials collected by dance critic Ann Barzel, documenting the history of dance in Chicago and worldwide. Research collection includes brochures and other publicity, newsclippings, programs, souvenir books, audiovisual material, posters and prints, photographs, scrapbooks, and artifacts.

Anthony Rayson zine collection

Anthony Rayson (b. 1954) is a writer, political activist, and self-described anarchist. Rayson authored the zine Thought Bombs, creates and contributes to numerous other zines, and assists incarcerated people with the publication and distribution of their own zines. Rayson operates South Chicago ABC Zine Distro, a distribution network that provides zines to incarcerated people free-of-charge.

Art & Soul Records

Art & Soul (1968-1969) was a nonprofit workshop and gallery project designed and organized by the Conservative Vice Lords, Inc. in partnership with the Museum of Contemporary Art. It provided a platform for the West Side community to pursue creative collaboration and arts education. These records include organizational and funding proposals, course materials, photographic copies, slides and DVDs, interview transcripts,

Aurie A. Pennick Papers

Chicago native, Aurie A. Pennick is an African American attorney and philanthropist whose work spans across Chicago's municipal and nonprofit organizations. Pennick's papers include her involvement with Mayor Harold Washington's Office of Women's Affairs, her decade of executive stewardship at the Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities and her ongoing engagement with housing and policing issues in Chicago. The collection

Bernard Weisberg papers

Correspondence, research files, legal documents, meeting minutes, newsletters, press releases, newspaper clippings, booklets, and other personal papers of Bernard Weisberg, a Chicago human rights lawyer. Materials relate to Weisberg's involvement with the 1970 Illinois Constitutional Convention and to his legal work, especially as general counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Illinois. Topics include police activities, the 1968

Beverly-Morgan Park Collection

The Beverly-Morgan Park Collection contains range of manuscript, printed and photographic materials on the development of these adjacent community areas in southwestern Chicago. The documentation includes information on businesses, clubs and organizations, municipal agencies, parks, religious institutions, residences, schools, transportation, and the Village of Morgan Park from its incorporation in 1892 until its annexation to the City of Chicago in

Biographical and Correspondence Files

Roosevelt’s founding in 1945 as an independent, nonsectarian, coeducational institution of higher learning was a feat requiring considerable courage. The new administration was determined to make higher education available to all students who could qualify academically. Considerations of social or economic class, racial or ethnic origin, sex, or age were, and remain, irrelevant in determining who is admitted. Originally named

Black Experience at Northwestern

Materials in this expanding collection pertain to the experience of African American students and faculty at Northwestern University. The documents included in this collection are university reports about African American students, articles on race and higher education, reproductions of student newspapers discussing race relations on-campus and materials concerning the 1968 Bursar's Office Takeover. This collection also includes biographical subject files.

Bronzeville expansion collection, 1950-2017

Materials from a variety of sources and dates documenting the past and present of the African-American neighborhood of Bronzeville, historically known as the Black Metropolis, located on the South Side of Chicago. This collection serve as a drop file of materials not otherwise accessioned and catalogued in the IIT Archives. Contains loose papers and soft cover books. Partial listing of

CARO Photo Archive

The CARO Photo Archive is a collection of still images (with a limited number of videos) created by Cook County Government throughout the 20th century, with some older photos dating back to the 1800s. Many of these photos were collected by or fell into the possession of former Secretary to the Board and County Historian Matthew B. DeLeon. Additionally, he

Charles Hayes papers

Charles Hayes was a union leader in the United Packinghouse Workers of America and in two successor unions from the 1940s through the 1980s. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1983 to 1993.

Chicago Alliance for Neighborhood Safety records

Members from nine community organizations in Chicago created the Chicago Alliance for Neighborhood Safety (CANS) in 1981 to create safer neighborhoods through the application of volunteer-centered and community-based crime prevention techniques. CANS was instrumental in the campaign to promote community policing in Chicago. The organization deserves much credit for the Chicago Police Department's implementation of the Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy

Chicago Great Lakes Underground Press collection

This collection began during the first annual Underground Press Conference in Chicago in August 1994. The initial plan was to build a collection of correspondence and other operational documents of the underground press and zine community in the Midwest. However, due to the informal nature of many underground presses, the original objectives were redefined to focus on collecting zines only.

Chicago Public Library archives. Branch Annual Reports.

Bound annual reports from various branches of the Chicago Public Libraries. The reports highlight special programming, demographics and user statistics; some are handwritten and include anecdotes from the librarian. "

Chicago SNCC History Project Archives

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) was founded in 1960 on the initiative of Ella Baker, a member and former executive director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). Seeing the need to capitalize on the student sit-in movement across the South and to incorporate more youth into the civil rights movement, Baker held a conference for student leaders in

Chicago Teachers Union records

The records of the Chicago Teachers Union are primarily textual and include meeting minutes and agendas, correspondence, reports, financial information, contracts, publications, clippings, flyers, scrapbooks, materials for mass distribution, and general office files created by the CTU, the Men’s Teachers Union, the Federation of Women High School Teachers, the Joint Board of Teachers’ Unions and the American Federation of Teachers.

Chicago Teachers Union visual materials

Black-and-white and color photographic prints, negatives, slides, and albums related to the work and promotion of the Chicago Teachers Union and its predecessors. Images depict union leaders, committees, conferences, meetings and activities, including demonstrations against payless paydays (1933) when the Chicago Board of Education could not pay its employees and later rallies and strikes. Also included are posters and placards;

Chicago Youth Centers Collection

Chicago Youth Centers (CYC) is Chicago's largest independent, locally based, multi-site youth services organization. It was founded in 1956 by two visionaries, Chicago businessmen Elliott Donnelley and Sidney Epstein, who wanted young people living in poverty to have an alternative to the streets. CYC was born out of three boys' clubs that had fallen on hard times. With the merger

Christopher Robert Reed Papers

Christopher Reed (1942 - ) is an author and historian who specializes in the history of African Americans in Chicago. From 1987 to 2009, he served as a professor at Roosevelt University. Aside from his academic pursuits, Dr. Reed serves on the Commission on Chicago Landmarks and various community organizations on the city’s West Side. The Christopher Reed papers span