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Hull-House (Chicago, Ill.). (10)     x 1890s (10)     x 1950s (10)     x 1930s (10)     x clear facets
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Arthur Hillman papers

Part of the Jane Addams Memorial Collection. Arthur Hillman (1910-1985) was a board member and director of the Chicago training office of the National Federation of Settlements and Neighborhood Centers as well as a professor of urban sociology at Roosevelt University. Associated with Roosevelt University since its founding in 1945, Hillman served as dean of the College of Arts and

Chicago Federation of Settlements and Neighborhood Centers collection

The collection contains minutes, speeches, annual reports, studies, reports, and correspondence dating from 1900 to the present. The materials pertain to Chicago area settlement houses, social work, childcare, public housing, poverty, Jane Addams, and Louise de Koven Bowen.

Henry Booth House records

The Henry Booth House Records include minutes, reports, correspondence, clippings, receipt books, surveys, questionnaires, brochures, social work files, research papers, photographs, negatives, and related materials from affiliated organizations such as the Hull House Association, Chicago Maternity Center, and Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago.

Hull House Association records

In 1963, Hull-House, the world-famous social settlement house founded by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr, moved from its original location in the Near West Side of Chicago and decentralized its services. The newly restructured Hull House Association became the administrative entity overseeing a confederation of affiliated organizations that included former settlement houses, newly created community centers, and a myriad

Hull-House collection

Hull-House, founded in 1889 by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr, was the first social settlement in Chicago. The settlement was incorporated in March, 1895, with a stated purpose to "provide a center for higher civic and social life, to initiate and maintain educational and philanthropic enterprises, and to investigate and improve the conditions in the industrial districts of Chicago."

Hyde Park Neighborhood Club records

The Hyde Park Neighborhood Club (HPNC) was founded in 1909 as part of the settlement house movement, to serve neglected or abandoned youth in Chicago's south side neighborhood of Hyde Park. It was deliberately named "the Club" as a reaction to the exclusivity of private clubs of the time. Over the years it has redefined its mission to respond to

Lea Demarest Taylor papers

Lea Demarest Taylor (1883-1975) daughter of Graham Taylor, founder of the Chicago Commons settlement house, and Leah Demarest Taylor was active in Chicago's social settlement movement. The collection contains correspondence, memos, articles, speeches, annual reports, minutes of meetings, and photographs.

Mary Bartelme papers

Part of the Jane Addams Memorial Collection. Part of the Midwest Women's Historical Collection. Mary Bartelme (1865-1954) was the first woman Judge of the Circuit Court of Cook County assigned to the Juvenile Court. She held that position from 1923 until her retirement in 1933. Prior to being elected a judge, Mary Bartelme worked in private practice as a probate

Off-The-Street Club records

The Off-The-Street Club (OTSC), Chicago's oldest boys and girls club, is a club for children and young adults located on Chicago's west side. The collection consists of annual reports, correspondence, organizational charts, newspaper clippings, newsletters, radio and television scripts, surveys, manuals, programs, published material, and photographs.

Wallace Kirkland papers

The collection consists of photography, writing, correspondence, exhibit materials and family papers of Wallace William Kirkland. The majority of the material dates from the early 1920s to Kirkland's death in 1979. The collection contains material pertaining to Kirkland's work with the YMCA, his career as a social worker at Hull-House, and his career as a photojournalist with Life Magazine. Also