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Abdullah Abdurahman (1872-1940) Family papers

The Abdullah Abdurahman family was active in the South African Coloured population’s struggle for political and economic equality.

Alexander Hepple papers

Alex Hepple was a member of the South African Parliament from 1948-1948. He was Parliamentary leader of the South African Labour Party and closely associated with the South African trade union movement for many years. Because of his practical experience in collective bargaining and labor affairs Hepple is a recognized authority on labor legislation and trade unionism. He served as

Black Sash papers

The Black Sash was a non-violent white women's resistance organization founded in 1955 in South Africa. The Black Sash provided widespread and visible proof of white resistance towards the apartheid system. Its members worked as volunteer advocates to families affected by apartheid laws; held regular street demonstrations; spoke at political meetings; brought cases of injustice to the attention of their

Chicago Anti Apartheid Movement collection

The end of the apartheid system was brought about, in part, by groups of people working locally around the globe who fought apartheid by endorsing economic sanctions and company boycotts. What we have broadly termed the “Chicago Anti Apartheid Movement” collection is made up of several local groups’ records. The Chicago Anti-Apartheid Movement Collection was assembled through the efforts of

Claude Barnett Research Collection circa 1950-1970

Consists of news clippings, photographs, and newsletters pertaining to African affairs during the 1950s and 1960s. The collection was assembled by Claude Barnett, director of the Associated Negro Press, a wire organization serving Black American newspapers, and the World News Service, which provided similar service to African newspapers from 1960 until 1963.

Dennis Brutus (1924-2009) Papers 1960-1984

Dennis Brutus, poet and South African expatriate, was an activist, working for an end to racial segregation in sport. The Dennis Brutus Papers comprise correspondence, papers associated with specific organizations and events, and numerous drafts of poems, both handwritten and typed.

Dennis Brutus Defense Committee records

The Dennis Brutus Defense Committee was formed in response to efforts by the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service to deport South African poet and anti-apartheid activist Dennis Brutus. Brutus, who was expelled from South Africa in 1966, came to the United States in 1970 on a British visa from Rhodesia, his country of birth. When in 1980 British Rhodesia

Edward Roux Clipping Scrapbook Collection

Edward Roux was a South African botanist and professor of botany at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. He was the author of Time Longer than Rope-- a History of the Black Man's Struggle for Freedom in South Africa, Gollanez, 1948. 2nd edition, 1964, and a contributor to South African Rationalist, Humanist, Freethinkers, and scientific journals.

Gwendolen M. Carter papers

Gwendolen M. Carter was a South African specialist and a professor of political science and African studies. Carter first visited Africa in 1948 while working on a study of the British Commonwealth. Her scholarly interests immediately turned to that continent, and she returned to South Africa for a yearlong study in 1952. In addition to receiving Ford and Rockefeller Foundation

Leo Kuper (1908-1994) papers

Leo Kuper was a South African born sociologist. In 1961 Kuper was appointed Professor of Sociology at the University of California at Los Angeles, where he remained until his retirement in 1976. While at U.C.L.A., he served for four years as the Director of the African Studies Center and also as a member of the Board of Directors of the

Prexy Nesbitt Anti Apartheid Collection

Prexy Nesbitt papers

Prexy Nesbitt was a leader in organizing Chicago’s support for southern African liberation and against apartheid. He wrote extensively on southern Africa and collected materials on liberation movements there.

Toward Freedom Newsletter records

Toward Freedom is a newsletter founded by William Bross Lloyd, Jr. in the late 1950's to call American attention to civil rights issues, African colonial and postcolonial issues, and other occurrences of racial and religious discrimination across the globe.